Let's talk about the real reason you are here. What are they worth?
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There is no easy answer to that question. Before I see a picture of what you have there is absolutely no way of knowing the value from just a description. Each arrowhead is unique and no two are exactly the same or worth the exact same amount. As a general rule there are four things that determine the value of an artifact.
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1. Rarity - Usually the older artifacts are worth the most. Humans have been in North America for at least 14,000 years, so the older the artifacts the more valuable. There are newer artifacts that can be worth as much or more, especially if they are rarely found complete or are made of a beautiful and colorful agate.
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2. Condition - Condition is everything, and undamaged artifacts aren't nearly as common as broken ones. This is why most people that have hunted for many years have mountains of broken artifacts and only a few complete ones. If only a little piece of the tip or base is chipped off, the value of an artifact falls dramatically. See the pictures below for examples of how condition can effect the value of an artifact.
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3. Material that it's made from - Native Americans were just like us and had an appreciation for colorful things. If you look at the page for my personal collection you'll notice that there are artifacts made from all kinds of colorful materials.
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4. Age - As I mentioned above, usually the older the more valuable. Paleo artifacts in the western US are roughly 9.000 to 14,000 years old. If you have one in perfect condition then you have something with considerable value.
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If you own a price guide for Native American artifacts I can tell you from many years of buying and selling that they rarely reflect real world prices. In my experience the most valuable collections were assembled by several members of a family over two or more generations. Collectors such as these usually hunt in a relatively small geographic location and separate the better quality artifacts from the broken artifacts. Some collections that I have purchased come with very detailed catalogs with a number assigned to each piece which shows when/where it was found and by who. Most of us don't put that much work into the hobby, but we still take great pride in what we have built and show them off whenever possible.
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The value of most collections is in a very small percentage of the overall artifacts, generally between 5 and 10 percent of the entire collection. When I look at pictures of a collection for the first time, I am looking for the more valuable artifacts that will ultimately determine what the entire collection is worth.